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This took me a while so I thought I should share the solution — however, see the caveat at the end, because there’s an element I haven’t tested yet.

The first requirement here is integrating Devise into Radiant. For the most part, the information at this page will get you there, though I’ll work on a separate post going through the process in detail. Once you have Devise working, then you have a user object, and naturally you’d like to display a “Logged in as…” element in your Radiant layout, right? Not so easy, it turns out.

In my testing I called the Devise model PortalUser since it has to be differentiated from the User model that Radiant uses. I put the authentication stuff into a custom extension, which we’ll call “my_auth”. So, I end up with my_auth_extension.rb:

class MyAuthExtension < Radiant::Extension
  
  SiteController.class_eval do
    include ContentManagement
    prepend_before_filter {|controller| controller.instance_eval {Thread.current[:current_portal_user] = current_portal_user} }
    prepend_before_filter {|controller| controller.instance_eval {authenticate_portal_user! if radiant_page_request?}}
  end

  # activate() method left out for brevity
end

The filter to call authenticate_portal_user! is needed to get Devise working. The other filter is the important one here, and what it does is get the current_portal_user reference in the controller and place it into the current thread for later access. This is the only way I’ve found (so far) to get something from a controller in Radiant to a tag. I’ve tried various instance variable tricks, all sorts of things, with no luck. If anyone has another solution, please do comment below, because yes, this seems like a hack.

Now we go create a new tag to display the logged-in user’s email address. In our extension we have lib/user_tags.rb:

module UserTags
  include Radiant::Taggable

  desc "Outputs the user email address"
  tag "user_email" do |tag|
    current_user = Thread.current[:current_portal_user]
    @user_email = current_user.email
    parse_template 'usertags/_email_template'
  end

  private

    def parse_template(filename)
      require 'erb'
      template = ''
      File.open("#{MyAuthExtension.root}/app/views/" + filename + '.html.erb', 'r') { |f|
        template = f.read
      }
      ERB.new(template).result(binding)
    end
end

First, let me give credit for the parse_template() method to Chris Parrish in this post. This tag simply gets the user object from the thread, and sets @user_email accordingly, which can then be used by the ERB template. parse_template() grabs the partial using the filename passed in, and renders it, which ends up being output by the tag. The partial, which lives in your extension as app/views/usertags/_email_template.html.erb, is simply:

<%= @user_email %>

So there’s nothing to that, really. If you modify your Radiant layout to include Logged in as: <r:user_email /> then you should be all set.

At the beginning I mentioned a caveat. I have not tested this yet to see what the effects of Radiant’s caching are — I am assuming that the tag contents will not be cached and thus all is well, but we will see. I’ve been bitten by the caching before in unexpected ways.

Anyway, I hope this helps someone out.

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